Innovation Generation

Innovation Generation book coverWhether you are a student or an established scientist, researcher, or engineer, you can learn to be more innovative. In Innovation Generation: How to produce creative and useful scientific ideas, internationally renowned physician and scientist Roberta Ness provides all the tools you need to cast aside your habitual ways of navigating the every-day world and to think “outside the box.”

Based on an extraordinarily successful program at the University of Texas, this book provides proven techniques to expand your ability to generate original ideas. These tools include analogy, expanding assumptions, pulling questions apart, changing your point of view, reversing your thinking, and getting the most out of multidisciplinary groups, to name a few. Woven into the discussion are engaging stories of famous scientists who found fresh paths to innovation, including groundbreaking primate scientist Jane Goodall, father of lead research Herb Needleman, and physician Ignaz Semmelweis, whose discovery of infection control saved millions. Finally, the book shows how to combine your newly acquired skills in innovative thinking with the normal process of scientific thinking, so that your new abilities are more than playthings. Innovation will power your science.

Reviews

Roberta Ness teaches how to be a more innovative thinker. Now in a book as creative as its subject, Dr. Ness shows how, with a little know-how and a lot of practice, we can all bring out our more creative selves.” — Harvey V. Fineberg, President, Institute of Medicine, National Academies of Science

“A thought-provoking dissertation on innovative thinking and how to circumvent the barriers that can inhibit our creativity. The range of ideas and approaches put forward here serve as a spur to further thought – and to action.” — Russell A. Hulse, Nobel Laureate in Physics

“Great science depends on innovative thinking. Our societal creativity and progress depends on investing in such innovation. This book argues that innovation can be taught, fostered, and nurtured as a basis for accelerating innovation. It provides the framework for fostering creativity and a toolbox teaching it. This is an outstanding contribution to our collective success.” — Linda P. Fried, Dean, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health

“Can we teach people to be innovative? Roberta Ness demonstrates that the answer is a resounding ‘yes.’ This is a rare book that contains both a rigorous account of the elements that foster innovation and examples that will inspire scientists, teachers, students, and anyone with a sense of curiosity to become more successful innovators.” — E. Gordon Gee, President, The Ohio State University

“Dr. Ness shows us that learning to become a better innovator is indeed possible. This book is a tremendous help for scientists, policy makers, and students of all ages.”
- Arthur “Tim” Garson, Director, Center for Public Health Sciences, and former Provost, University of Virginia School of Medicine

“Innovation Generation: How to Produce Creative and Useful Ideas is a superb read. The path to a strong and vibrant America today and into the future will be through the inculcation of innovation among our students across all disciplines. Roberta Ness provides substantive tools to enhance our ability for critical learning and innovation. More importantly, she emphasizes how important it is for us to inspire and facilitate innovative thinking from our students and not to inadvertently suppress students from challenging mainstream ideas, even if they are our own.” — Francisco G. Cigarroa, University of Texas System Chancellor

Roberta Ness, MDContact Information

Office: 1200 Herman Pressler
RAS W114A
Houston, Tx 77030
713-500-9052
Email
Curriculum Vitae

Dean & M. David Low Chair in Public Health
Division
Epidemiology
Center
Center for Innovation Generation

Research Interests

  • Innovation in Science
  • Women's health
  • Epidemiology of Ovarian Cancer
  • Preeclampsia
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  • Adverse Pregnancy and Perinatal Outcomes
  • Links Between Reproductive History and Cardiovascular Disease