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A young girl uses an inhaler to treat asthma. (Photo by Getty Images.)

Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma

Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health.

A photograph of a family loading luggage into a car. The photo is by Getty Images.

Planes, trains and automobiles: reducing the risks of traveling this summer

After enduring more than two months of quarantine, businesses and institutions are reopening, spurring summer travel plans to satisfy the urge to escape confinement. But is it safe to travel with the threat of COVID-19 still lingering? Experts at UT Physicians and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) weigh in on how to reduce the risks of traveling and make health-conscious decisions as we plot out the summer.

A woman stands on a scale to weigh herself. (Photo by Getty Images)

Mental, physical health of people with obesity affected during COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is having a significant impact on people with obesity as they struggle to manage their weight and mental health during shelter-in-place orders, according to research led by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and UT Southwestern. 

A woman reviews a CT scan with her doctor. Photo by Getty Images.

Researchers examine data to identify optimal vasopressor treatment for rare type of stroke

Results of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) study assessing the most commonly used medications for raising blood pressure in patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a rare type of stroke, have been published in Neurosurgical Focus by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).


Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma

A young girl uses an inhaler to treat asthma. (Photo by Getty Images.)

June 16, 2020

Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health.


Planes, trains and automobiles: reducing the risks of traveling this summer

A photograph of a family loading luggage into a car. The photo is by Getty Images.

June 12, 2020

After enduring more than two months of quarantine, businesses and institutions are reopening, spurring summer travel plans to satisfy the urge to escape confinement. But is it safe to travel with the threat of COVID-19 still lingering? Experts at UT Physicians and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) weigh in on how to reduce the risks of traveling and make health-conscious decisions as we plot out the summer.






The search for IgG: What you need to know about antibody testing

Photo of physician conducting antibody research, as researchers say antibody testing will play an important role in navigating decisions on reopening the country safely. (Photo credit: Getty Images)

April 28, 2020

As officials consider how to reopen the country safely, researchers say antibody testing will play an important role in navigating those future decisions. But not all antibody tests are created equal, and the presence of antibodies doesn’t necessarily equate to COVID-19 immunity.


Public health experts explain what our new normal will look like

A woman wearing a mask prepares to open up her business. Photo by Getty Images.

April 21, 2020

As local, state, and national government leaders release guidelines on reopening businesses and returning to a “new normal” during the COVID-19 pandemic, public health and infectious disease experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) say a gradual, cautious return would be the most effective.


Tracking COVID-19: New research app will help trace the spread of the virus

COVID Symptom Tracker app

April 15, 2020

As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise in the U.S., a new free research app is hoping to slow the outbreak of the disease by tracking symptoms of millions across the country. To bring the app home to Texans, researchers at UTHealth have joined the national research project led by Harvard University.



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