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Researchers tested different ways of providing food to families who have limited access to healthy foods. (Photo by Getty Images)

Study finds easy access to produce, resources boosts healthy eating for central Texas kids

Providing caregivers easy access to produce and flexible resources can lead to improvements in kids’ diets in a short time, according to a new study co-authored by researchers with UTHealth School of Public Health together with researchers from Dell Medical School at The University of Texas at Austin.

Photo of woman getting her blood drawn. (Photo by Getty Images)

COVID-19 antibodies can last up to 500 days after infection

Adults infected with COVID-19 develop circulating antibodies that last for nearly 500 days, according to a new study led by researchers at UTHealth School of Public Health.

The findings were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Photo of Jack Tsai, PhD, and Vanessa Schick, PhD, with UTHealth School of Public Health.

UTHealth Houston researchers awarded over $6 million in CPRIT grants

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) awarded over $6 million to researchers with UTHealth Houston to aid in cancer prevention research. These awards will expand liver cancer prevention to persons experiencing homelessness, facilitate communication about the HPV vaccine, and find therapeutics that can help destroy gastrointestinal cancer cells.

Photo of child after getting blood drawn. (Photo by Getty Images)

Natural COVID-19 antibodies lasts seven months for children, according to new study

Children previously infected with COVID-19 develop natural circulating antibodies that last for at least seven months, according to a new study led by researchers at UTHealth Houston.

UTHealth research: Police officers face multifaceted, compounding stressors that can lead to adverse events during high-stress calls

Three police vehicles in the foreground with crime scene tape. (Photo by Getty Images)

August 18, 2020

Repeated exposure to high-stress calls for service and ongoing exposure to stress without relief were two of the contributing factors that could lead law enforcement officers to become susceptible to adverse events while performing their duties, according to a new study published in BMC Public Health by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).



Children with developmental disabilities more likely to develop asthma

A young girl uses an inhaler to treat asthma. (Photo by Getty Images.)

June 16, 2020

Children with developmental disabilities or delay are more at risk of developing asthma, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open led by public health researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) as part of the Center for Pediatric Population Health.


Planes, trains and automobiles: reducing the risks of traveling this summer

A photograph of a family loading luggage into a car. The photo is by Getty Images.

June 12, 2020

After enduring more than two months of quarantine, businesses and institutions are reopening, spurring summer travel plans to satisfy the urge to escape confinement. But is it safe to travel with the threat of COVID-19 still lingering? Experts at UT Physicians and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) weigh in on how to reduce the risks of traveling and make health-conscious decisions as we plot out the summer.






The search for IgG: What you need to know about antibody testing

Photo of physician conducting antibody research, as researchers say antibody testing will play an important role in navigating decisions on reopening the country safely. (Photo credit: Getty Images)

April 28, 2020

As officials consider how to reopen the country safely, researchers say antibody testing will play an important role in navigating those future decisions. But not all antibody tests are created equal, and the presence of antibodies doesn’t necessarily equate to COVID-19 immunity.


Public health experts explain what our new normal will look like

A woman wearing a mask prepares to open up her business. Photo by Getty Images.

April 21, 2020

As local, state, and national government leaders release guidelines on reopening businesses and returning to a “new normal” during the COVID-19 pandemic, public health and infectious disease experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) say a gradual, cautious return would be the most effective.



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