UTH

Change the future of Texas

Be part of the movement that’s establishing new research and programs to help everyone, from the youngest to the oldest members of our communities, lead healthier lives.

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ADVOCATING FOR A HIGHER
QUALITY OF LIFE

A degree from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health provides you with the critical foundation for launching a career on the front lines of public health. At our Austin campus, we focus on the small opportunities for change in the way people live their lives on a day-to-day basis, knowing that one small step to make someone healthier today has the potential to affect the health of whole families, neighborhoods and cities in the future. With classes led by international experts, and proximity to the heart of Texas’ state government, this is where you learn to balance global perspective with local impact.

Build a career that makes a difference. 

COVID-19 Response


Working with community partners, local government, and health care organizations to fight the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Research


Work alongside faculty to address urgent public health matters through world-class research and community projects.

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Areas of Study


Tailor your degree to compliment your career goals and build your knowledge and expertise in a specific area of study.

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News


Latest headlines and updates from our people creating an impact in their communities and beyond

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UTHH-SPH-Austin-15-H-OrangeGray-PMS

UTHealth School of Public Health Austin Campus is celebrating 15 years of building public health in Central Texas through excellence in professional development and training, transdisciplinary research, and translation of scientific knowledge into action to create healthy habits.

Celebrate with us

Group of Austin Faculty photographed in front of the Austin Capitol Building
  • TexasCARES REPORT

    About 75% of Texans have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, according to one of the world's largest COVID-19 antibody surveys

    “Texas CARES data revealed to us that fully vaccinated participants showed significantly higher antibody levels than those with a natural infection only,” said Eric Boerwinkle, PhD, dean of the School of Public Health.

    READ MORESPH - TexasCARES Report

    TexasCARES Graphic
  • SCHOOL RANKING

    UTHealth School of Public Health ranked top among academic programs shaping public health workforce

    The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health is one of the top universities in the nation responsible for training the bulk of today’s public health academic leaders, according to a recently released independent analysis.

    READ MORESPH - school ranking

    Photo from the School's 50th anniversary celebration in 2019.
  • SEE OUR IMPACT

    Fighting back against the vaping epidemic among youth

    As e-cigarette use by young people reaches epidemic proportions, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have received a $3.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct the first-ever assessment on the long-term results of a nationwide nicotine vaping prevention program for youth called CATCH My Breath.

    READ MORESPH - Our Impact - vaping epidemic

    Steven H. Kelder, PhD, MPH
  • STUDYING DURING A PANDEMIC 

    Spotlight on Sierra Castedo de Martell, MPH 

    Sierra Castedo de Martell, a Behavioral Sciences PhD student at the Austin campus shares how COVID-19 is shaping her studies and changing her perspective on public health work.

    READ MORESPH - Studying in a pandemic - castedo

    Sierra sits in her home office/nursery, holding her infant son.
  • SEE OUR IMPACT

    Mapping the spread of COVID-19 in Texas

    A working team of faculty, staff and students recently launched a visualization dashboard which provides real-time data analytics to monitor COVID-19 spread in the state of Texas.

    READ MORESPH - Our Impact - Covid Dashboard

    An image of the world made to look like the outline of a coronavirus. (Image is Creative Commons)
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