UTH

School of Public Health COVID-19 Research, Programs and Media

Photo of child after getting blood drawn. (Photo by Getty Images)

Natural COVID-19 antibodies lasts seven months for children, according to new study

Children previously infected with COVID-19 develop natural circulating antibodies that last for at least seven months, according to a new study led by researchers at UTHealth Houston.

Photo of Maria E. Fernandez, PhD.

HRSA grants $10.3 million to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates for three minority, low-income populations in Texas

A one-year, $10.3 million dollar grant from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) was awarded to increase COVID-19 vaccinations through the development and mobilization of existing community-based health and outreach workforces in the state by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston).

Photo of young man getting a shot. (Photo by Getty Images)

New model reveals achieving an 80% HPV vaccination rate could eliminate nearly 1 million cases of male oropharyngeal cancer this century

A nationwide effort to adequately vaccinate 8 in 10 adolescents against the human papillomavirus (HPV) could prevent 934,000 cases of virus-associated, male oropharyngeal cancer over this century, reported investigators at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston) School of Public Health in The Lancet Regional Health—Americas.

Take care Texas! graphic

Take Care, Texas! aims to provide COVID-19 resources to underserved populations across the state

Earlier this year, the UTHealth Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research (CHPPR) launched Take Care, Texasan online resource for up-to-date information on COVID-19 testing in Texas. Take Care, Texas is a part of the Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics for Underserved Populations (RADxUP) program, which aims to develop an adaptive intervention to increase COVID-19 testing in vulnerable communities. 


Studying public health during a pandemic

Sierra Castedo de Martell and Brianna

July 20, 2020

See how our summer semester students are learning to tackle the public health problems of today and tomorrow from their home classrooms. This the first of a two-part series. We’ll be checking in with another group of students in the next few weeks.



Planes, trains and automobiles: reducing the risks of traveling this summer

A photograph of a family loading luggage into a car. The photo is by Getty Images.

June 12, 2020

After enduring more than two months of quarantine, businesses and institutions are reopening, spurring summer travel plans to satisfy the urge to escape confinement. But is it safe to travel with the threat of COVID-19 still lingering? Experts at UT Physicians and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) weigh in on how to reduce the risks of traveling and make health-conscious decisions as we plot out the summer.





The search for IgG: What you need to know about antibody testing

Photo of physician conducting antibody research, as researchers say antibody testing will play an important role in navigating decisions on reopening the country safely. (Photo credit: Getty Images)

April 28, 2020

As officials consider how to reopen the country safely, researchers say antibody testing will play an important role in navigating those future decisions. But not all antibody tests are created equal, and the presence of antibodies doesn’t necessarily equate to COVID-19 immunity.


Public health experts explain what our new normal will look like

A woman wearing a mask prepares to open up her business. Photo by Getty Images.

April 21, 2020

As local, state, and national government leaders release guidelines on reopening businesses and returning to a “new normal” during the COVID-19 pandemic, public health and infectious disease experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) say a gradual, cautious return would be the most effective.


Tracking COVID-19: New research app will help trace the spread of the virus

COVID Symptom Tracker app

April 17, 2020

As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise in the U.S., a new free research app is hoping to slow the outbreak of the disease by tracking symptoms of millions across the country. To bring the app home to Texans, researchers at UTHealth have joined the national research project led by Harvard University.



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