UTH

School of Public Health COVID-19 Research, Programs and Media

Photo of a father and son at a Texas CARES event.

Children infected with a mild case of COVID-19 can still develop long COVID symptoms

While research has revealed that children and adults hospitalized with COVID-19 are more susceptible to developing long COVID symptoms, a new study by researchers at UTHealth Houston found that children infected with COVID-19, but not hospitalized, still experienced long COVID symptoms up to three months past infection.

The study was published in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

Photo of woman getting her blood drawn. (Photo by Getty Images)

COVID-19 antibodies can last up to 500 days after infection

Adults infected with COVID-19 develop circulating antibodies that last for nearly 500 days, according to a new study led by researchers at UTHealth School of Public Health.

The findings were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Photo of child after getting blood drawn. (Photo by Getty Images)

Natural COVID-19 antibodies lasts seven months for children, according to new study

Children previously infected with COVID-19 develop natural circulating antibodies that last for at least seven months, according to a new study led by researchers at UTHealth Houston.

Photo of Maria E. Fernandez, PhD.

HRSA grants $10.3 million to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates for three minority, low-income populations in Texas

A one-year, $10.3 million dollar grant from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) was awarded to increase COVID-19 vaccinations through the development and mobilization of existing community-based health and outreach workforces in the state by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston).



Studying public health during a pandemic

Sierra Castedo de Martell and Brianna

July 20, 2020

See how our summer semester students are learning to tackle the public health problems of today and tomorrow from their home classrooms. This the first of a two-part series. We’ll be checking in with another group of students in the next few weeks.



Planes, trains and automobiles: reducing the risks of traveling this summer

A photograph of a family loading luggage into a car. The photo is by Getty Images.

June 12, 2020

After enduring more than two months of quarantine, businesses and institutions are reopening, spurring summer travel plans to satisfy the urge to escape confinement. But is it safe to travel with the threat of COVID-19 still lingering? Experts at UT Physicians and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) weigh in on how to reduce the risks of traveling and make health-conscious decisions as we plot out the summer.


Public health experts explain what our new normal will look like

A woman wearing a mask prepares to open up her business. Photo by Getty Images.

April 21, 2020

As local, state, and national government leaders release guidelines on reopening businesses and returning to a “new normal” during the COVID-19 pandemic, public health and infectious disease experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) say a gradual, cautious return would be the most effective.


How to encourage healthy eating for the body and mind during stay-at-home orders

Photo of Wesley McWhorter, MS, RD, preparing food with Laura Moore, MEd, RD, and students watching (Photo by Terry Vine)

April 8, 2020

Stay-at-home orders from government officials due to the COVID-19 pandemic have forced us to quickly adapt to a new normal, especially when it comes to eating. Restaurant dining rooms are closed, grocery shopping can be challenging, many parents are tasked with serving meals while working from home, and families who relied on school meals are now left to provide them since schools closed.


COVID-19 just a problem for elderly people, right? Think again.

A photo of a crowded beach. Photo by Getty Images.

March 24, 2020

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is urging all Americans – and now especially young adults – to avoid crowded spaces and gatherings of 10 people or more, and to continue practicing social distancing. Experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) echo that message.



UTHealth School of Public Health holds coronavirus expert panel

Image of Scott Patlovitch speaking at the school of public health. A person in personal protective gear needed to serve coronavirus patients sands to the left of him.

February 7, 2020

In response to increasing concerns of 2019-nCoV (coronavirus), public health experts from the southeast Texas region and UTHealth School of Public Health gathered on Wednesday, Feb. 5, to discuss what is known, unknown, and what to anticipate about this new strain of coronavirus.



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