UTH

School of Public Health COVID-19 Research, Programs and Media

Photo of woman getting her blood drawn. (Photo by Getty Images)

COVID-19 antibodies can last up to 500 days after infection

Adults infected with COVID-19 develop circulating antibodies that last for nearly 500 days, according to a new study led by researchers at UTHealth School of Public Health.

The findings were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Photo of child after getting blood drawn. (Photo by Getty Images)

Natural COVID-19 antibodies lasts seven months for children, according to new study

Children previously infected with COVID-19 develop natural circulating antibodies that last for at least seven months, according to a new study led by researchers at UTHealth Houston.

Photo of Maria E. Fernandez, PhD.

HRSA grants $10.3 million to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates for three minority, low-income populations in Texas

A one-year, $10.3 million dollar grant from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) was awarded to increase COVID-19 vaccinations through the development and mobilization of existing community-based health and outreach workforces in the state by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston).

Photo of young man getting a shot. (Photo by Getty Images)

New model reveals achieving an 80% HPV vaccination rate could eliminate nearly 1 million cases of male oropharyngeal cancer this century

A nationwide effort to adequately vaccinate 8 in 10 adolescents against the human papillomavirus (HPV) could prevent 934,000 cases of virus-associated, male oropharyngeal cancer over this century, reported investigators at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston) School of Public Health in The Lancet Regional Health—Americas.

COVID-19 antibodies can last up to 500 days after infection

Photo of woman getting her blood drawn. (Photo by Getty Images)

May 31, 2022

Adults infected with COVID-19 develop circulating antibodies that last for nearly 500 days, according to a new study led by researchers at UTHealth School of Public Health.

The findings were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.




New model reveals achieving an 80% HPV vaccination rate could eliminate nearly 1 million cases of male oropharyngeal cancer this century

Photo of young man getting a shot. (Photo by Getty Images)

December 15, 2021

A nationwide effort to adequately vaccinate 8 in 10 adolescents against the human papillomavirus (HPV) could prevent 934,000 cases of virus-associated, male oropharyngeal cancer over this century, reported investigators at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston) School of Public Health in The Lancet Regional Health—Americas.


Take Care, Texas! aims to provide COVID-19 resources to underserved populations across the state

Take care Texas! graphic

December 9, 2021

Earlier this year, the UTHealth Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research (CHPPR) launched Take Care, Texasan online resource for up-to-date information on COVID-19 testing in Texas. Take Care, Texas is a part of the Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics for Underserved Populations (RADxUP) program, which aims to develop an adaptive intervention to increase COVID-19 testing in vulnerable communities. 



State and local officials emphasize vaccine’s critical role in crushing COVID-19

Harris County Precinct One Commissioner Rodney Ellis received his second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. (Photo by Cody Duty/UTHealth)

January 25, 2021

In one of the Houston neighborhoods hit hardest by the coronavirus, state and local public officials, together with leaders from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and The University of Texas System, gathered at UT Physicians Multispecialty-Jensen on Saturday, Jan. 23, to encourage everyone to roll up their sleeves and receive the COVID-19 vaccine.


Stay-at-home orders tied to an increase in harmful alcohol consumption, study finds

The study is one of the first to analyze the association of stress caused by the pandemic and dangerous alcohol consumption. (Image by: UTHealth).

December 14, 2020

Binge drinkers increased their alcohol consumption by nearly 20% during COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, according to new research by public health experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Their study, published in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, is one of the first to analyze the association of stress caused by the pandemic and dangerous alcohol consumption.





Page 1 of 3
LOADING...
LOADING...