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The Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research

Kayo Fujimoto, PhD

Photo of Kayo Fujimoto, PhD

Sally W. Vernon, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor in Social Determinants of Health
Professor
Kayo.Fujimoto@uth.tmc.edu

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Department

Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, Primary appointment

Biostatistics and Data Science, Secondary appointment

School of Biomedical Informatics, Adjunct appointment

Research Interests

Social Network Analysis
HIV/AIDS & STI Research
Social Determinants of Health
Healthcare Delivery Systems
MSM Populations
Organizational Research
Molecular Epidemiology
Respondent-Driven Sampling (RDS) Methodology
Categorical Data Analysis
Machine Learning/Deep Learning
Agent-Based Network Modeling
Adolescent Substance Use

Biography

Kayo Fujimoto, PhD’s research specializes in the development and application of social network methodology, various statistical methods, and deep learning to health behavior, disease transmission, and population health, including HIV/AIDS & STI, men who have sex with men (MSM) populations, molecular epidemiology, organizational networks, and healthcare delivery systems. As a principal investigator, Dr. Fujimoto has led multiple NIH-funded, multi-site projects related to social networks and HIV/STI risk/preventive behaviors among young MSM populations, and currently serves as a standing NIH committee member for the Population and Public Health Approaches to HIV/AIDS (PPAH) Study Section.

Contact

Email: Kayo.Fujimoto@uth.tmc.edu 
Phone: +1 (713) 500-9766

Current Projects

Supplement for Next-generation phylodynamics-targeted partner service models for combined HIV prevention | NIH/NIAID R01AI13605

Site PI. This supplement project proposes to examine next generation responses to HIV related events in ending the epidemic contexts in Chicago and Houston.

Methodology and Advanced Analytics Resource Center (MAARC) | NIH/NIDA U2C DA050098

Site PI (a Core Methodology Leader for Social Network Analysis). This project proposes advanced bi-directional data sharing, analytics, and modeling capacities to provide new scientific insights into interventions at the intersection of opioid use and justice contexts. The MAARC (at the University of Chicago) will support these capabilities within opioid clinical trials implemented within justice contexts, serving as one of the 12 research hubs of a U2 consortium project that comprises a national network of investigators of JCOIN (the Justice Community Opioid Innovation Network).

Supplement for HIV intervention models for criminal justice involved substance-using Black MSM | NIH/NIDA 3R01DA039934

Multiple PI. This supplement project proposes to examine institutional and social network contributors to opioid use (including prescription opioids, heroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl), opioid use disorder, and opioid-related harms among younger Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) with involvement in the criminal justice/corrections system.

HIV intervention models for criminal justice involved substance-using Black MSM (BARS: Building Agent-based Models for a Racialized Justice System) | NIH/NIDA 1R01DA039934

Thumbnail image for HIV intervention models for criminal justice involved substance-using Black MSM (BARS: Building Agent-based Models for a Racialized Justice System) | NIH/NIDA 1R01DA039934

This project aims to study the effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions for criminal justice (i.e., jail and community supervision) involved younger Black men who have sex with men in HIV prevention services by developing Agent-based Network Modeling methodology. This study is conducted in three sites (Chicago, Houston, and Los Angeles).

Next-generation phylodynamics-targeted partner service models for combined HIV prevention | NIH/NIAID R01AI136056

Site PI. This projects aims to guide and transform the rapidly evolving public health implementation of molecular HIV surveillance (MHS) based prevention interventions as a critical step towards HIV elimination in Chicago and Houston.

Network Dynamics of Syphilis Co-infection within Biomedical Prevention | NIH/NIAID 1R21AI13948

This project takes biological, behavioral, and epidemiological perspectives to investigate complex syphilis-HIV transmission dynamic processes, coevolved with sex behavioral dynamic, and sexual network dynamic, and risk reduction behavioral dynamic among young Black men who have sex with men at the aim of creating effective syphilis eliminations interventions for most-at-risk population in the United States.