2021 Lectureship in Child Health

Join us for the 2021 Annual Michael & Susan Dell Center Lectureship in Child Health featuring Keynote Speaker Anthony B. Iton, MD, JD, MPH.

When It Comes to Your Health, Does Your Zip Code Matter More Than Your Genetic Code?

In 2013 when Forbes magazine listed the top ten healthcare quotes for 2013, the number one quote was attributed to me: “When it comes to health, your zip code matters more than your genetic code.” This brief presentation will address some of the data and evidence behind that quote by exploring the strength of the relationship between life expectancy and neighborhood. Using hundreds of thousands of death certificates, GIS mapping and other simple data analyses, a profile of life expectancy by neighborhood in seven different cities and regions will be presented. The implications for US health spending and population health management will be discussed and a model for understanding the social determinants of health will be presented.

Keynote Speaker:
Anthony B. Iton, MD, JD, MPH
Senior Vice President, Healthy Communities
The California Endowment

Thursday, April 22, 2021
12:30 - 2:00 PM (CT)

REGISTER ONLINE


About the Annual Michael & Susan Dell Center Lectureship in Child Health

Lectureship logo 2019-01

The Michael & Susan Dell Center Lectureship in Child Health is an annual event held in Austin each spring to recognize distinguished researchers who have made outstanding contributions to child health. The Lectureship is an academic forum to increase research capacity and partnerships within the Texas community, and to provide visibility for senior scientists in the fields of child health and obesity prevention. Since its inception in 2007, the annual Lectureship has honored a broad range of prominent national and international child health experts, whose research areas have included healthful eating, obesity prevention, physical activity, food policy, and community and youth development.

The Michael & Susan Dell Center Lectureship in Child Health is administered through funding from the Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living, part of The University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health in Austin.