Marcia Otto, PhD

Photo of Marcia Otto

Assistant Professor, Epidemiology, Human Genetics & Environmental Sciences
Marcia.C.Otto@uth.tmc.edu

Marcia Otto's research interests are on the effects of different aspects of diet on cardiovascular and metabolic health. She received her M.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. After completing her PhD at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health with a focus on micronutrient intakes and their relationships with inflammation and cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes in a multiethnic population, Dr. Otto received her postdoctoral training in Nutritional and Cardiovascular Epidemiology at Harvard T.C. Chan School of Public Health.

Her current research projects include the study of circulating dietary fatty acids their effects on cardiovascular and cognitive outcomes, the evaluation of the role of diet diversity and quality on cardiometabolic disease, and the estimation of the impact of suboptimal diet and metabolic risk factors on mortality in Brazil.

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Recent Publications

"Longitudinal Associations of Omega-6 and Omega-3 Plasma Phospholipid Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids With Dementia in Older Adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study."

(de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C., Jason H. Wu, Evan L. Thacker, Heidi Lai, Rozenn N. Lemaitre, Barbara McKnight, Nikhil Padhye et al. Circulation 139, no. Suppl_1 (2019): A046-A046.)

Serial circulating omega-3 polyunsaturated-fatty acids and healthy ageing in older adults: Cardiovascular Health Study

(Lai HTM, de Oliveira Otto MC, Lemaitre RN, McKnight B, Song X, King IB, Chaves PHM, Odden MC, Newman AB, Siscovick DS, Mozaffarian D; British Medical Journal; 2018)

Dietary Interventions and Type 2 Diabetes in Youth: a Fresh Look at the Evidence

(Perkison WB, Adekanye JA, de Oliveira Otto MC; Current Nutrition Reports; 2018)

Dietary Diversity: Implications for Obesity Prevention in Adult Populations Dietary, a Science Advisory from the American Heart Association

(de Oliveira Otto MC, Anderson CAM, Dearborn JL, Ferranti EP, Mozaffarian D, Rao G, Wylie-Rosett J, Lichtenstein AH; Circulation: 2018)

Dietary Diversity

(de Oliveira Otto, Marcia, Cheryl Anderson, Jennifer Dearborn, Erin Ferranti, Dariush Mozaffarian, Goutham Rao, Judith Wylie-Rosett, and Alice Lichtenstein. Circulation 138, no. 11 (2018).)

Recent News

Diverse diets may lead to overeating

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You may be able to save money and stay healthy by limiting your snack choices at work to just one. An advisory from the American Heart Association shows eating a large variety of foods may backfire.

Americans may have outgrown traditional advice of having a varied diet

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When it comes to diet in the Western world of overconsumption where cheap convenience food rules, the age-old adage “everything in moderation” has been put to the test, prompting the American Heart Association (AHA) to issue a science advisory led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

The Vindication of Cheese, Butter, and Full-Fat Milk

Thumbnail image for The Vindication of Cheese, Butter, and Full-Fat Milk

As a young child I missed a question on a psychological test: “What comes in a bottle?” The answer was supposed to be milk. I said beer. Milk almost always came in cartons and plastic jugs, so I was right. But this isn’t about rehashing old grudges.

New Research Could Banish Guilty Feeling for Consuming Whole Dairy Products

Thumbnail image for New Research Could Banish Guilty Feeling for Consuming Whole Dairy Products

Enjoying full-fat milk, yogurt, cheese and butter is unlikely to send people to an early grave, according to new research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).