UTH

Dale Mantey, PhD, MPA

Photo of Dale Mantey

Assistant Professor, Health Promotion & Behavioral Sciences
Dale.S.Mantey@uth.tmc.edu

Dale Mantey, PhD, MPA, is Assistant Professor at UTHealth School of Public Health Austin Campus. Dr. Mantey was a National Cancer Institute postdoctoral fellow from 2020 to 2022. Dr. Mantey received his PhD in Health Promotion/Behavioral Science from UTHealth School of Public Health Austin Campus, his Masters in Public Administration (MPA) from Texas State University, and his BA in History and Psychology from Angelo State University. 

Dr. Mantey researches adolescent health behaviors with an emphasis on substance use/misuse. Dr. Mantey currently researches nicotine and cannabis use among youth and young adults, exploring patterns of behavior across modalities (i.e., cannabis vaping; blunt smoking). Dr. Mantey’s research investigates adolescent substance use with the intention of informing evidence-based intervention and regulatory policy. 

Prior to entering academic, Dr. Mantey served as program supervisor of a comprehensive tobacco control program in Northern Colorado. This project included leading a community health coalition in successfully advocating for local level policy change (e.g., adopting smoke-free ordinances), coordinating school-based education and advocacy activities, and expanding tobacco cessation services to low-income and indigent populations. Prior to this, Dale served as a Health Policy Analyst in the Texas House of Representatives during the 83rd Legislative Session.

Dr. Mantey was formally trained under the Texas Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science (TCORS) and co-developed the CATCH My Breath E-Cigarette Prevention Program (CMB) for middle school students. Dr. Mantey’s work has been published in journals such as Journal of Adolescent Health, Nicotine & Tobacco Research, and Tobacco Control.

Recent News

Student-athletes with concussions more at risk for suicide

Thumbnail image for Student-athletes with concussions more at risk for suicide

A somber warning for parents: A new study suggests that concussions in high school athletes may be a risk factor for suicide. Concussions are the most common form of traumatic brain injury. Symptoms include loss of consciousness, headache, dizziness, nausea, confusion and changes in mood.

Student athletes with concussions more at risk for suicide, study finds

Thumbnail image for Student athletes with concussions more at risk for suicide, study finds

A somber warning for parents: A new study finds that concussions in high school athletes may be a risk factor for suicide.

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